Man seeks return of father's stolen ashes

By CLAY MCFERRIN,

Wesley Brasher and his father were very close.

When the U.S. Army veteran of Korea died in January 2014 at the age of 80, Brasher clung to some of the possessions that his dad left behind.

He prized a black leather wallet that his father carried and was proud to own his dad’s .45-caliber pistol.

There were other items, some bearing little monetary value but all having great sentimental value to the 35-year-old Brasher simply because they had belonged to his dad.

On the night of Jan. 31 or early morning of Feb. 1, someone broke through a window and entered Brasher’s home at 664 Oakland-Enid Road near Enid.

Brasher said they ransacked the house, walking off with a variety of tools, a glass jar of coins and a wedding ring set, among other items.

The thief or thieves took his father’s black wallet and handgun.

In their haste, they also grabbed a brown plastic container from atop the dresser in Brasher’s bedroom.

“They probably thought it was valuable or that it might have something of value in it,” Brasher noted.

They were right, of course.

Inside the container, which bore a sticker from Wells Cremation Services in Batesville, was a plastic bag with the ashes of Brasher’s late father.

“I know they didn’t realize what they were grabbing when they took that,” Brasher said Monday, tears welling in his eyes and his voice cracking.

Tallahatchie County Sheriff William Brewer said Tuesday that officials have no suspects in the case.

Brasher, however, hopes that someone — perhaps even the perpetrators — will read about the crime and find a way to return the most important stolen item.

“I don’t really care about any of the other stuff. Keep it,” Brasher said.

He has an idea of how the thief, if he still has the container, can make amends.

“Just stick it out by my mailbox at the road or in the mailbox,” he noted.  “Or let me know where you’re leaving it. I’m not trying to set anybody up. I just want my daddy’s ashes back.”

Brasher also said there is a possibility that the container was discarded and that someone, somewhere might find it.

He will be hoping, and waiting by his phone. Call him at 662-388-1076.